Part 18: Seventeen Seventy

After Fraser Island we left Maryborough and drove to our next destination, a place called Seventeen Seventy (1770). We arrived late in the afternoon and set up the tent in the pooring rain. Moments after we were done setting it up it stopped raining and the sun came out to such a degree that we went down to the local beach next to our campsite for a quick dip and some sunbathing. I spent most of the time filming a little crab digging out his burrow in the sand, he was so cute! Going in the sea was such a relief as we were all sweating furiously from the post-rain humidity. There was no denying it now, the weather was definitely tropic!

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

The next day we drove into the town of 1770, a town famous for being one of the first stops made by Captain Cook on is exploration of Australia. The bay was calm and protected, with lots of yachts and boats moored in the open waters. After checking out the bay we decided we should check out Agnes Water beach too, just round the corner in the neighbouring town, famous for being Queensland’s most northern surf beach. Beaches after this don’t have any strong waves as the Great Barrier Reef takes most of the brunt.

Town of 1770. 

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Agnes Waters beach. 

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

After spending some time on the beach we had some lunch and headed for a tiny board walk among some very rare paperbark forests. This dense wetland and threatened vine forest is important habitat for several threatened species, including beetles, snakes and birds. The paperbark forests had a sparse canopy that let lots of light down to the wetland floor. The forest was quite dry that day, and the flooded floor bed was not to be seen. We still walked on the stepping stones that were there for walkers to walk when the forest floor was flooded though! It was a magical forest, I can imagine it being even more magical when the water covers the ground too.

Paperbark forest, Seventeen Seventy

Paperbark forest, Seventeen Seventy

Paperbark forest, Seventeen Seventy

After the walk we parted our ways, I was dropped off at 1770 beach and the other three went on another walk around the peninsula head of the town. I was feeling very tired that day and didn’t fancy straining my ankle, so some alone time at the beach was definitely welcomed. I had seen some people snorkeling around some rocks earlier and decided to see if there was anything worth seeing there for myself (I also couldn’t miss the opportunity to look like the sexiest person alive in my snorkeling gear). Around the rocks I got caught up in the incoming tidal current and had to swim so much to get to safety again. I lay down on my towel for a while and had a rest, before trying in a different location. This time I thought it through and walked up along beach to a patch of mangroves and went exploring around those before drifting down along the beach with the current back to my towel. The mangroves themselves held the most interesting exploration, where I saw a group of silver fish, some big flat ones and hermit crabs. Back on the shore I met up with the rest of the gang and made stir fry dinner in the local bbq areas next to beach before watching the sunset over the ocean. This you think is no big deal, but indeed with it being on the east coast, that was quite a rarity and a rare treat for the Australians. Because of the way the peninsula lay, the sun seemed to set on the water (which was actually over mountains and the bay, but it was close enough)! On way back to car spotted a fallen ripe mango from the mango tree we saw earlier and opened it up and hade some juicy, fresh mango fruit.

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

Seventeen Seventy

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