Aging churches with David for some post exam stress relief

David and I had decided that after my Social Evolution exam on Wednesday we should go for a long walk in the warm summer weather. The exam itself went ok, I haven’t really decided where on the spectrum of “I completely stuffed it”-to-“that exam went perfect” I am, but I am pretty sure I am somewhere in the middle. Maybe towards the lower end of the middle. I can’t decide you see, because it’s been two years since my last exam at UEA and the exams I did in Australia were relatively easier, and so I can’t remember far enough back to relevant exams to compare. I reckon it’s around the lower to mid end of 50%, like I always get on exams at UEA. I hope so anyway, I sincerely hope it’s not any worse. The uncertainty of it all has made me a little depressed actually. I hate exams so much. Exams are so old and dated now too. It’s purely a measurement of a students ability to memorise and write grammatically correct under extreme time constraints. How does this reflect my dedication to my degree in any way? 2 hours to write 2 essays by hand?? It’s like the uni has set me up to fail. I don’t understand why they don’t just scrap them and have it all based on coursework. It’s a better quality product, it requires more synthesis of information, and encourages learning of methods and theory in a far more organic way, that is far more relevant for any future job related to this degree.

Anyway, after the exam (and a thorough spring house clean), David and I headed out on our walk. We had decided to do the parish walk we did in first year (remember?), a wonderful walk that takes you along the Yare river, over bridges, past lots of quaint churches, over train tracks, between fields of grazing horses and cattle, and past peaceful neighbourhoods. David has taken a History subject this year on historic British landscape with an exam on dating English churches among other things. He therefore took the opportunity during the walk to practice his church dating skills with his trusty book guide, assessing window sizes, shapes and architectural features of the building. It was very interesting listening to him explain to me how he was dating the church, particularly when we uncovered that most of them were built in stages with “extensions” like church towers added in different eras. I particularly liked hearing about the different window styles. For example the very small windows photographed bellow are probably around late Saxon or early Norman, dating them around 1050-1100 A.D. How cool isn’t that?!

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

Parish walk with David

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